This new radar system could help make flying cars and delivery drones a reality

Tech titans like Uber, Amazon, and Google have all laid out ambitious plans for filling the skies with autonomous aircraft. Uber wants to move people around with flying taxis, and Airbus is committed to producing this kind of vehicle. Meanwhile Google and Amazon are hoping to deliver packages with much smaller drones. All see the potential for fleets of unmanned aerial vehicles that can pilot themselves.

Read the rest at The Verge »

Echodyne’s radar helps drones avoid smashing into each other

The skies of the future are going to be crowded with drones, and a startup called Echodyne is anticipating that day with a new radar that helps drones detect and avoid each other.

Bellevue, Wash.-based Echodyne said it has successfully tested its “detect and avoid” (DAA) radar on a small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The radar was mounted on a small commercial drone that flew multiple missions below 400 feet over a couple of days. The drone was of a size, payload, and range suited to applications such as package delivery, infrastructure inspection, and agricultural monitoring.

Read the rest at VentureBeat »

Metamaterial Radar Is Exactly What Delivery Drones Need

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As we’ve pointed out over the last few years, there are some issues with the idea of urban or suburban delivery drones. Besides the fact that they’re illegal right now, the biggest technological problem is that none of the delivery drones that we’ve seen so far seem to have any kind of sense-and-avoid capability that could realistically deal with the challenges of urban airspace, including everything from other drones to light aircraft to birds to trees to overhead wiring.

Read the rest at IEEE Spectrum »

This Bill Gates-backed startup says it just knocked down one of the last things stopping drones from taking over the world

Echodyne, a radar array startup with investors including Bill Gates, his Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen’s Vulcan Capital, and Seattle’s own Madrona Ventures, just made what the company considers a landmark announcement for the future of self-driving vehicles.

Basically, Echodyne’s big breakthrough product is the Metamaterial Electronically Scanning Array (MESA) — a radar arrays that’s small enough to mount on a drone — like the ones Amazon or Google might use for their drone delivery programs — but that the company says is orders of magnitude more powerful than the kind you’d find on existing self-driving cars and drones.

Read the rest of the article at Business Insider »

Echodyne’s drone-sized radar detection system passes its first flight test

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BELLEVUE, Wash. – A radar-equipped drone is blazing a trail for the day when flying robots fill the skies – and deliver your packages.

The drone took to the air last month in Texas for a series of tests aimed at finding out how well Bellevue-based Echodyne’s miniaturized detect-and-avoid radar could spot obstacles and other aircraft. The results confirmed that Echodyne is on the right track.

Read the rest of the article at GeekWire »

Echodyne Announces the First Successful Airborne Detect and Avoid Radar Test on a Small Drone

Detect And Avoid Radar on Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Provides Avenue to Open the National Airspace System to Beyond Visual Line of Sight Drone Operations

November 8, 2016, Bellevue, Wash. – Echodyne Corp today announced the first ever successful test of an airborne Detect and Avoid (DAA) radar on a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (sUAV).  Echodyne’s radar was mounted on a small commercial drone which flew multiple missions below 400’ over a period of several days.  The drone was of a size, payload, and range well suited for package delivery, infrastructure inspection, and agricultural monitoring.

Echodyne’s detect and avoid technology enables a drone to ‘see’ moving and stationary obstacles using ‘radar vision’ as the drone flies through the airspace beyond line of sight of its operator.  The radar tests were conducted with an undisclosed partner using Echodyne’s developer kit radar with its patented Metamaterial Electronically Scanning Array (MESA). Echodyne’s radar is based on metamaterials technology which enables the radar to deliver high-performance electronic scanning in a smaller, lighter and less expensive form factor than has been previously thought possible.

“It’s great to see our technology performing in real world field tests exactly as designed,” said Echodyne founder and CEO Eben Frankenberg. “We’ve made tremendous progress with our technology in a very short time and are excited to release our MESA-DAA radar into the market in just a few months. Tests like this show that advanced radar can be deployed directly on small commercial UAVs to ensure safe beyond line of sight drone operations. Unlike other sensor technologies such as cameras and LIDARs, radar provides accurate tracking of obstacles at long range across a broad field of view in all types of weather.”

During the testing missions, the radar successfully scanned a broad field of view in both azimuth and elevation (up to 120° x 80°) detecting and tracking multiple types of aircraft including a small UAV, a Beechcraft Bonanza, and an ultralight aircraft flying through its airspace. The radar provided a 4D data cube of radar returns accurately depicting ground vegetation, barbed wire fences and other stationary obstacles, as well as the flight paths of the tracked aircraft. The tests used Echodyne’s developer kit radar which is a precursor to its MESA-DAA radar, which will detect and track Cessna sized objects up to 3km away and small drones up to 750m away.  MESA-DAA will be available to commercial customers in early 2017.

“This test brings us one step closer to fulfilling Echodyne’s mission to make the world a safer place by enabling cars, drones and other vehicles to sense the world around them,” said Tom Driscoll, PhD, founder and CTO of Echodyne.  “Phased array radars have long been the pinnacle of radar technology, but they remain too costly for commercial use. MESA operates very similarly to a phased array, but at a tiny fraction of the cost, size, weight and power, making it ideal for all kinds of high performance commercial applications including radar vision for drones and cars.”

Detect and Avoid Critical for Beyond Visual Line of Sight Operations
In the FAA’s recently issued rules for small UAV operation, all UAVs need to remain within visual line of sight of their pilot who is responsible for avoiding collisions. There is widespread acceptance that for UAVs to fly beyond line of sight of their operator, they will need DAA sensors and systems that safely replace the pilot’s “see and avoid” capability. And just like a pilot in a manned aircraft, any DAA system will need to detect and avoid both cooperative objects (e.g. those transmitting their position with a transponder) and non-cooperative objects (e.g. aircraft without transponders, birds, etc.); and do so reliably in a diverse range of weather conditions.
In its Aerospace Forecast, the FAA points out the importance of DAA to the long term success of the UAS industry, noting that “the overall demand for commercial UAS will soar once regulations more easily enable beyond visual line of sight operations and operations of multiple unmanned aircraft by a single pilot.”

About Echodyne
Echodyne is making the world a safer place through breakthrough radar vision technology for the autonomous era.  Echodyne’s patented Metamaterial Electronically Scanning Array (MESA) provides disruptive capabilities for existing radar applications, and enables high performance commercial radars never before thought possible such as small, lightweight, high performance radars for UAVs, autonomous cars and trucks, and security surveillance systems. Echodyne is a privately held company backed by Bill Gates, Madrona Venture Group, Vulcan Capital, Lux Capital, and The Kresge Foundation, among others.

Media Contact
Erika Shaffer
erika@madrona.com
206-972-5514

Compact Radar System Promises to Let Small Drones Cut the Leash

CSWAP-vs-iPhone6 2The many use cases for drones are now clear. They can help tend crops more efficiently, find people lost in the wilderness, and even carry packages. How drones can be widely used for such things safely is much less certain.

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration says it won’t allow small drones to go beyond their pilot’s line of sight until technology is developed that allows the small fliers to detect and avoid other aircraft. That restriction would ground ideas like Amazon and Google’s plans for package delivery and make many others less lucrative.

Read the rest of the article at MIT Technology Review »

Echodyne unveils a palm-size radar that’s just right for drones and driverless cars

CSWAP-vs-iPhone6 2
BELLEVUE, Wash. – Radar and aircraft go together like hand and glove, but what do you do when the aircraft is a commercial drone that weighs less than a fully loaded suitcase? Bellevue-based Echodyne is taking the wraps off a radar system that’s just a step up from smartphone size but provides advanced capabilities for drones and autonomous vehicles.

Read the rest of the article at GeekWire »

Echodyne Announces Development of Airborne Detect and Avoid Radar for Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems

New radar provides avenue to open the National Airspace System to beyond visual line of sight UAS operations

May 2, 2016, Bellevue, Wash.Echodyne Corp today announced the development of MESA-DAA, an Airborne Detect and Avoid (DAA) radar for small to medium-sized unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). The small, lightweight, and low power DAA radar will operate at K-band and be capable of rapidly scanning a broad field of view in azimuth and elevation at ranges out to 3km. MESA-DAA is based on Echodyne’s patented Metamaterials Electronically Scanning Array (MESA™), which offers breakthrough cost, size, weight, and power (C-SWAP) improvements over traditional electronically scanning array technology. The MESA-DAA radar is scheduled for release at the end of 2016 and will be an evolution of the MESA-K-DEV radar, which Echodyne released today.

“Detect and avoid is the single biggest technical hurdle to opening up the National Airspace System to UAS,” said Jim Williams, former head of the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) UAS Integration Office and current Principal at Dentons US, LLP and Echodyne advisor. “NASA, the FAA, industry, and academia have spent years studying the DAA problem and have determined radar is by far the best sensor, if not the only sensor, capable of providing the all-weather, long-range, and broad field of view scanning that is necessary for safe, highly reliable DAA. MESA-DAA technology may well represent the key to safely opening up airspace for beyond visual line of sight operations.”

Detect and Avoid Requirement
One of the FAA’s central aircraft operating rules is that pilots maintain vigilance so as to see and avoid other aircraft. To fulfill this requirement today, UAS need to remain within visual line of sight of their pilot. Although the regulations for UAS are still in development, there is widespread acceptance that for UAS to fly beyond line of sight of their operator, they will need DAA sensors and systems that safely replace the pilot’s see and avoid capability. This DAA capability will need to detect both cooperative objects (those transmitting their position with a transponder) and non-cooperative objects (aircraft without transponders, birds, etc.).

Radar is the only sensor capable of reliably performing DAA in all weather conditions and at the ranges, broad fields of view and scanning speeds necessary for safe operation of UAS in the NAS. Radar is the only sensor that directly measures the position of an object (i.e., range, azimuth, elevation) as well as its relative speed of approach (via Doppler).

“We believe MESA-DAA will be a critical technology for safely opening up the National Airspace System to small UAS for beyond visual line of sight operations,” said Eben Frankenberg, founder and CEO of Echodyne. “Radar is the sensor of choice for DAA, but existing radar technology is too slow, too bulky, and too expensive to provide DAA radar capabilities on small UAS. The C-SWAP characteristics of MESA and our DAA radar are completely unparalleled and uniquely well suited for small UAS.”

Market Opportunity
In the newly released FAA Aerospace Forecast, the FAA reports that it has already granted more than 4,000 Section 333 Exemptions for commercial UAS operations, clear evidence of the high demand for UAS applications. The FAA forecasts that sales of commercial small UAS could exceed 600,000 for 2016 and grow to 2.7 million by 2020, noting that “the overall demand for commercial UAS will soar once regulations more easily enable beyond visual line of sight operations and operations of multiple unmanned aircraft by a single pilot.”

MESA-DAA Specifications
MESA-DAA is based largely on Echodyne’s existing MESA-K-DEV radar. Package size and weight are expected to be less than MESA-K-DEV—especially if the unit is placed inside the UAS. Range is expected to be 3KM, and scanning speed is expected to be 1Hz for the entire field of view and as fast as 10Hz for updating locations on previously detected objects. The field of view for a single unit is expected to be ±60° in azimuth (120° total) and ±45° in elevation. Multiple units can be combined if greater field of view is desired.

MESA-K-DEV
In a separate release today, Echodyne announced availability of MESA-K-DEV, an ultra-low C-SWAP, fast electronically scanning radar based on its patented MESA. The radar operates at K-band and the fully self-contained and packaged unit measures a mere 22 x 7.5 x 2.5 cm and weighs only 820 grams.

About MESA
Unlike conventional mechanical apertures that steer a radar beam using motorized gimbals, Echodyne’s MESA requires no moving parts to steer its beam. And unlike Phased Array radars or Active Electronically Scanning Array radars that require complicated and expensive transmit/receive modules—including phase shifters, amplifiers, circulators, and low noise amplifiers behind every single antenna element—MESA uses a vastly simpler metamaterials architecture. The net effect of this simplified architecture is dramatically lower cost, size, weight and power.

About Echodyne
Echodyne is reinventing the way the world uses radar by creating high performance electronically scanning radars with ultra-low C-SWAP (cost, size, weight, and power).  Echodyne’s patented Metamaterial Electronically Scanning Array (MESA) offers disruptive capabilities for existing radar applications, and enables new categories of radars never before thought possible such as small, lightweight radars for UAVs, robots, autonomous vehicles, and security that work well even when environmental conditions are less than ideal (e.g. in rain, snow, fog, dust, darkness, etc.).  Echodyne is a privately held company backed by Bill Gates, Madrona Venture Group, Vulcan Capital, Lux Capital, and The Kresge Foundation, among others.

Media Contact
Alec Drozdowski, 206-282-4923 ext. 125
Sarah Elson, 206-282-4923 ext. 121
EchodynePR@CommuniquePR.com
Virtual Press Office: http://xponential.vporoom.com/Echodyne

Echodyne Releases Breakthrough Ultra-Low C-SWAP Electronically Scanning Radar

New technology enables high-performance radar for commercial markets and applications

May 2, 2016, Bellevue, Wash.Echodyne Corp today announced availability of MESA-K-DEV, an ultra-low C-SWAP (cost, size, weight, and power), fast electronically scanning radar based on its patented Metamaterials Electronically Scanning Array (MESA™). Released as a developer’s kit, MESA-K-DEV is designed to give end customers and integrators the ability to test the breakthrough C-SWAP characteristics and capabilities of MESA-based radar. MESA-K-DEV is evocative of a number of breakthrough future applications, including: Airborne Detect and Avoid radars on small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), dramatically enhanced autonomous vehicle radars, security radars capable of drone detection, and many others.

“MESA-K-DEV is like no other radar ever produced,” said Eben Frankenberg, founder and CEO of Echodyne. “The C-SWAP characteristics are completely unparalleled for a true electronically scanning radar. Phased array radars – long the radar of choice for defense applications – are way too complex, expensive, bulky and heavy for commercial applications and even for many military applications. MESA makes high performance radar practical for commercial applications and platforms never before thought possible.”

Specifications of MESA-K-DEV
Echodyne’s MESA-K-DEV operates at K-band and has a broad field of view (±60° in azimuth and ±40° in elevation), which it can scan rapidly with sub-microsecond beam switching speed. The radar unit is a mere 22 x 7.5 x 2.5 cm, with a total weight of only 820 grams. Completely self-contained, MESA-K-DEV includes the metamaterial array, the array control driver circuitry, the beam steering computer, and a fully integrated transceiver and processors. The aperture is controlled through a simple USB Type C interface and requires only a single +7 to +28V DC source to operate. MESA-K-DEV consumes ~20W in operation and <1W in standby. Convective cooling provided by the aluminum housing allows the unit to operate in temperatures from -40 to +75C.

In a separate release today, Echodyne also announced the development of its next radar specifically designed for Airborne Detect and Avoid for small to medium sized UAS. The Airborne Detect and Avoid radar, scheduled for release at the end of 2016, will be an evolution of MESA-K-DEV and an important technological milestone to support beyond visual line of sight operations for small UAS.

About MESA
Unlike conventional mechanical apertures that steer a radar beam using motorized gimbals, Echodyne’s MESA requires no moving parts to steer its beam. And unlike Phased Array radars or Active Electronically Scanning Array radars that require complicated and expensive  transmit/receive modules – including phase shifters, amplifiers, circulators, and low noise amplifiers behind every single antenna element – MESA uses a vastly simpler metamaterials architecture. The net effect of this simplified architecture is dramatically lower cost, size, weight and power.

About Echodyne
Echodyne is reinventing the way the world uses radar by creating high performance electronically scanning radars with ultra-low C-SWAP (cost, size, weight, and power).  Echodyne’s patented Metamaterial Electronically Scanning Array (MESA) offers disruptive capabilities for existing radar applications, and enables new categories of radars never before thought possible such as small, lightweight radars for UAVs, robots, autonomous vehicles, and security that work well even when environmental conditions are less than ideal (e.g., in rain, snow, fog, dust, darkness, etc.).  Echodyne is a privately held company backed by Bill Gates, Madrona Venture Group, Vulcan Capital, Lux Capital, and The Kresge Foundation, among others.

Media Contact
Alec Drozdowski, 206-282-4923 ext. 125
Sarah Elson, 206-282-4923 ext. 121
EchodynePR@CommuniquePR.com
Virtual Press Office: http://xponential.vporoom.com/Echodyne

 

Echodyne Brings First Metamaterials Based Radar Antenna to Market

Bellevue, WAEchodyne Corp today announced limited availability of its first metamaterials electronically scanning array (MESA) for radar applications. Echodyne’s MESA makes high performance radar far easier to deploy by lowering both the cost and weight by up to 10 or more times while decreasing the size of the antenna by up to 5 or more times over traditional electronically scanned arrays.  The first product from Echodyne, a metamaterials electronically scanning array for X-band (MESA X-EVU) is now available for partners and integrators interested in evaluating MESA for radar systems in a variety of commercial markets including maritime, aviation, and surveillance/security among others.

“We are very pleased with the early reception of MESA-X-EVU by key partners and are excited to be able to offer more units to qualified partners and integrators,” said Eben Frankenberg, founder and CEO of Echodyne.  “Metamaterials based radar has the opportunity to not only change how traditional, heavy, expensive radar systems are deployed but can open up new markets for advanced radar that were never before thought possible because of the cost, size and weight of traditional electronically scanned arrays.”

Echodyne’s MESA X-EVU combines ultra-low C-SWAP (cost, size, weight, and power) with ultra-fast beam steering (sub-microsecond) in an electronically scanning array that can be integrated into new or existing radar systems.

Unlike conventional mechanical apertures which steer a radar beam using motorized gimbals, Echodyne’s MESA requires no moving parts to steer its beam. And unlike Phased Array radars or Active Electronically Scanning Array (AESA) radars that use complicated, expensive, and inefficient transmit/receive modules which include phase shifters, amplifiers, circulators, and low noise amplifiers behind every single antenna element, MESA uses a vastly simpler metamaterials architecture. The net effect of this simplified architecture is dramatically lower cost, size, weight and power.

Specifications

Echodyne’s MESA-X-EVU operates at X-band and has a broad field of view (±50° in azimuth and ±45° in elevation) which it can scan very rapidly given its sub-microsecond beam switching speed.  The MESA-X-EVU subsystem includes the metamaterial array, the array control driver circuitry, and the beam steering computer. Fully assembled without packaging, the subsystem is a mere 50 x 18 x 2.5 cm with a total weight of only 1.4 kg. While this size and weight already demonstrates a vast improvement over traditional electronically scanning arrays, Echodyne will be decreasing this even further as the company optimizes the technology for various implementations.  The aperture is controlled through a simple USB 2.0 interface and requires only a single +12 DC source to operate. Integrators and radar manufacturers interested in evaluating MESA-X-EVU can connect their own Pulsed or FMCW transceivers through a single coax SMA port.

Echodyne has produced a limited number of MESA-X-EVU to share with qualified partners and integrators.  Companies interested in learning more about Echodyne MESA generally, and MESA-X-EVU specifically should contact Echodyne directly at partners@echodyne.com.

About Echodyne

Echodyne is reinventing the way the world uses radar by creating high performance electronically scanning radars with ultra-low C-SWAP (cost, size, weight, and power). Echodyne’s patented Metamaterial Electronically Scanning Array (MESA) offers disruptive capabilities for existing radar applications, and enables new categories of radars never before thought possible such as small, lightweight radars for UAVs, robots, autonomous vehicles, and security that work well even when environmental conditions are less than ideal (e.g. in rain, snow, fog, dust, darkness, etc.)  Echodyne is a privately held company backed by Bill Gates, Madrona Venture Group, Vulcan Capital, Lux Capital, and The Kresge Foundation, among others.

Media Contact: Erika Shaffer, erika@madrona.com, 206-972-5514

Bellevue company develops advanced radar system

echodyne-seattletimes

The Bellevue company is using “metamaterial” engineering to develop a small, relatively low-cost radar for commercial use.

In a nondescript office tucked near Highway 520 in Bellevue, a couple dozen physicists and engineers think they have reached what may be the biggest breakthrough in commercial radar in a generation.

The company, Echodyne, shipped its first radar-array prototype to a prospective partner in July. It’s currently offering a handful more devices for other radar makers to evaluate.

Read the full article at seattletimes.com »

This Unsexy Technology is Set to Revolutionize the Drone Industry

Better, smaller and cheaper situational awareness will fuel the next leap forward in the commercial drone industry.

Fortune MagazineThe idea of skies filled with autonomous flying robots that change the way people interact with the world has grown in popularity amongst futurists and entrepreneurs alike. Largely absent from the public conversation is a discussion about the inherent shortcomings in unmanned aerial systems: namely that without a human pilot aerial vehicles are flying blind.

Read the rest of the article at Fortune.com »

Metamaterial Radar May Improve Car and Drone Vision

Powerful radar, mostly limited to the military, could soon be cheap enough for cars and consumer drones to use.

Plenty of people play with small drone aircraft in their backyards these days. Tom Driscoll, cofounder and chief technology officer of a startup called Echodyne may be the only one whose quadcopter packs the kind of sophisticated radar used on fighter jets. “We flew it around, did some collision avoidance, and locked onto one of our engineers and followed him around my backyard,” says Driscoll.

Radar instruments that can be used that way are normally bulky and extremely expensive. Echodyne is working on a device that is compact and cheap enough to be used widely.

Read the rest of the article MIT Technology Review »

The Waves of the Future May Bend Around Metamaterials

Plastics. Computers. Metamaterials?

Eben Frankenberg and Tom Driscoll of Echodyne with a prototype radar in a test chamber. Credit Kyle Johnson for The New York Times

Eben Frankenberg and Tom Driscoll of Echodyne with a prototype radar in a test chamber.
Kyle Johnson for The New York Times

Almost half a century after Dustin Hoffman was taken aside in “The Graduate” and given the famous “one word” line about the future, it may be time to update the script again. And metamaterials appear to have the same potential to transform entire industries. Over the past 15 years or so, scientists have learned how to construct materials that bend light waves, as well as radar, radio, sound and even seismic waves, in ways that do not naturally occur.

First theorized in 1967 by the Russian physicist Victor Veselago and invented in 1999 by a group led by the physicist David R. Smith, the new design approach was first seen as a curiosity that hinted at science fiction applications like invisibility cloaks.

But today, researchers have gained a better understanding of the science and are generating innovations in an array of fields, including radio antennas, radar, cosmetics, soundproofing and walls that help protect against earthquakes and tsunamis.

Read the rest of the article at The New York Times »

Echodyne Announces $15 million Series A Led by Bill Gates and Madrona Venture Group

Company Spins Out from Intellectual Ventures to Bring Metamaterials-Based Radar Systems to Market

Bellevue, WA – December 19, 2014 – Echodyne Corp announced today its initial round of funding led by Bill Gates and Madrona Venture Group, with participation from Vulcan Capital, Lux Capital, The Kresge Foundation, and others. The fourth spin-out from Intellectual Ventures (IV), Echodyne will bring to market radar products based on metamaterials technology invented by IV in collaboration with Duke University and the University of California at San Diego. The company is led by co-founders Eben Frankenberg (CEO) and Tom Driscoll (CTO).

“Echodyne’s innovative use of metamaterials holds great promise for a wide range of new radar applications,” said Bill Gates.  “I’ve worked with Eben for almost a decade and I’m looking forward to what Echodyne will accomplish with his leadership.”

Echodyne is the exclusive licensee of IV’s metamaterials technology for radar applications and represents the third spin-out from IV based on metamaterials, which are artificially structured materials used to control and manipulate a range of physical phenomena including electromagnetic radiation.

“The launch of Echodyne is an exciting new proof point for our Metamaterials Commercialization Center and IV will continue to invest accordingly in this very promising space,” said Nathan Myhrvold, CEO of Intellectual Ventures. “I cannot imagine a better founding team for Echodyne than Eben – a leader who’s earned my utmost trust and respect, and Tom – a gifted technologist steeped in metamaterials.”

Frankenberg, Echodyne’s CEO, played a crucial role at IV for nearly a decade leading the company’s efforts to create and spin-out companies, incubating and overseeing IV’s Lab and Global Good, and serving five years as IV’s COO. Prior to IV, Frankenberg spent nine years leading sales, marketing, and business development for Onyx Software as it grew from a basement start-up to more than 800 people and a NASDAQ listing. Frankenberg started out as a scientist with an MS in Geophysics from Stanford University and a BA from Dartmouth College.

“I’m very excited about the market potential for our breakthrough metamaterials-based radars. They stand to be disruptive to existing radar markets, but also enabling for whole new categories of radars never before contemplated or thought possible,” said Frankenberg. “I’m grateful to our investors, who share our vision, to IV for inventing and incubating the technology, and to commercial and government customers and partners who are giving us a positive and welcome reception.”

Co-founder and CTO, Tom Driscoll has been at the forefront of metamaterials technology for more than a decade. Most recently he was the Director of the IV Metamaterials Commercialization Center where he oversaw multiple research and development projects including the initial work in radar. Prior to that, Driscoll held research roles at Duke University, where he helped pioneer the technology behind IV’s second metamaterials spin-out, and at the University of California, San Diego. Driscoll holds a PhD in Physics from UCSD.

“Madrona loves to invest in great entrepreneurs who are developing novel and innovative technology and attacking huge markets. Echodyne truly embodies all of these attributes. We are thrilled to be working with Eben and Tom, who are world-class, and bring a tremendous mix of product, business and research rigor and experiences to bear in building Echodyne,” said Tim Porter, Managing Director of Madrona Venture Group and Echodyne board member.

About Echodyne Corp
Echodyne (www.echodyne.com) is bringing to market metamaterials-based radar products. The company is privately held and headquartered in Bellevue, WA.

About Madrona Venture Group
Madrona (www.madrona.com) has been investing in early-stage technology companies in the Pacific Northwest since 1995 and has been privileged to play a role in some of the region’s most successful technology ventures. The firm invests predominantly in seed and Series A rounds across the information technology spectrum, including consumer Internet, commercial software and services, digital media and advertising, networking and cloud computing, and mobile. Madrona manages approximately $1 billion and was an early investor in companies such as Amazon.com, Apptio, Isilon Systems, Extrahop, and Redfin.

About Intellectual Ventures
Founded in 2000, Intellectual Ventures (IV) is the global leader in the business of invention. IV collaborates with leading inventors, partners with pioneering companies and invests both expertise and capital in the process of invention. IV’s mission is to energize and streamline an invention economy that will drive innovation around the world. For more on IV’s other spin-outs, please visit www.intellectualventures.com/inventions-patents/spinouts-programs/

Media contact:

Erika Shaffer, Erika@madrona.com, 206-674-6330